Archive for the ‘Auto Teacher’ Category

Why would I want to be an Automotive Technician?

February 20, 2013

DSC02856

Picture from; http://tinyurl.com/6huzch5

A lot of people are telling young people that they should be anything but an auto technician or be in the auto industry at all.  Many private collages promote automotive careers that pay well but with huge student loans. Most students are not aware that great opportunity’s with OEMS are sometimes fully funded if they are qualified.  Sure in some areas Micky D’s pays more to start, but what will you be doing next year or the years after? ( http://autop.ro/3Kr ) and they furnish tools and such to flip burgers and teach you to ask if they want fries with that.
Many dealerships don’t know where the nearest auto training school or technical college is at, as they are so focused on sales.  Nor do the local auto teachers know who or how to to talk to the business so they can have a business and educational beneficial relationship. Somehow we need to fix this gap in communication.

Sadly our industry’s workers are getting older as we speak  and with technology exceeding the wildest predictions of the engineers that create driver less cars and exotic powered engines we need younger, smarter technicians to service the vehicles of tomorrow right now!

Many criticize the current trend to get students into the auto industry via low tech positions. Sir Ken Robinson points out the deficiency of of current educational system in this TED talk. many of his points are very relevant to a hands on approach to learning.

http://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution.html

Be sure to watch Sir Ken’s other talks to understand his focus.

Many drop outs are prime candidates for the hands on training required to “Fix things” in many areas of expertise.

Here is what started this dialogue; please do not read this blog with out reading James’ story!

Wired Mag Article on James Hamilton, who started as an auto mechanic.  http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/02/james-hamilton-amazon/

I asked James a question in this email;

Hi James, I read the wired article that said you started as an auto mechanic.

 My biggest challenge today is to get young people to consider a career as an auto technician. We have programs to start them but the student or the parent does not see the future in being a technician as rewarding. Could I have your thoughts on this?
I know your time is very valuable.
Thank you,
James replied;

“I might understand why some folks might find automotive technician less exciting than, say, fighter pilot. But when it comes to rewarding and to thinking through whether automotive technician is a rewarding role, I would say two things: 1) What is truly unrewarding is to not have a job and 2) what you learn as a mechanic can be applied and remain useful for entire lifetime. I learned an incredible amount as an automotive mechanic and I’m really happy I made that choice back when I was 17. Getting through an formal apprenticeship and becoming a licensed mechanic taught me the discipline and the focus to succeed at that role and gave me the confidence to take on others. The skills I learned at 17, I still apply today.
I see resumes all the time that have periods where the candidate was unemployed or weren’t challenging themselves and weren’t learning. It’s a mistake.” end of quote.

I know my personal journey was difficult and not of the standard of the day. I struggled with learning in traditional school after the 8th grade and dropped out after the ninth (see the blog http://semperfigeorgia.wordpress.com/for details)  trade school or Technical school/college as it is now was my salvation. Growing up on a farm and hating it was what drove me to cars and working on them, I wanted to learn to fix them so I could go somewhere I was not. The local junkyard with it’s old cars was much more exciting than hoeing a pea field all day in the hot sun. Having a car as a teenager gave me a power I could relate to.  I took the road less traveled and never looked  in the rear view mirror.

Regrets I have a few but that which is with out repair is without regard! I would rather be a happy ditch digger than an unhappy king.

Create, Share, Enjoy!

TEFGA is All About Student Success in Transportation Careers

February 1, 2013

Transportation Education Foundation of Georgia organizes the Career Expo for the Georgia State SkillsUSA Conference to be held March 21, 22 @ the Georgia International Convention Center. This is one of our best kept secrets in Career Education. You and your company need to be involved in this awesome gathering of career focused young people.

Here is a report from the TEFGA .org site on last year’s Expo:

The 2012 SkillsUSA Career Expo and Championships was a huge success with over 7,000 participants. TEFGA   _2013TEFGA Fact Sheet    helped to organize the largest student focused career expo in the state, in which for two exciting days students are able to explore different career opportunities within the transportation fields, network with industry representatives and discover the options available for post-secondary education. The best students from across the state competed in competitions to test their transportation knowledge. These contests ranged from Automotive Service Technology and Collision Repair to Diesel Equipment Technology to Fight Operations and Aviation Service. Other contests tested student’s knowledge of small engines and marine and motorcycle service. The results were students realizing their goals and being rewarded for their hard work, through prizes, recognition and often scholarships for additional education.

To see the top teams in the nation compete  http://www.hotroddersoftomorrow.com/ Georgia has three of the top five teams for 2012.

The Georgia SkillsUSA Conference  http://www.skillsusageorgia.org/

To volunteer to work with the expo, To have your company showcased at the expo,  To meet some of the best young people focused on technical careers contact Erin.

For more information on how you can get involved in TEFGA’s activities to build Georgia’s future workforce in the transportation industries, please contact Erin Studstill:

Visit our Facebook Page Follow us on Twitter

Email: erinstudstill@tefga.org

Click on the links for more information.

SkillsUSA_CareerExpo_Flyer

Video from 2011 Expo and Skills Conference,  http://tefga.org/Videos.htm

http://tinyurl.com/2013-SkillsUSA-CareerExpo

TEFGA Expo and Skills Sponsorship Form

2013TEFGA General Donation Form

TEFGA Sponsors Industry Accreditation Workshop for Georgia Teachers

November 9, 2012

NATEF Workshop for Georgia Teachers.  November 1, 2012

Georgia Department of Education Program specialist Ms. Carol Burke presented the latest news to the teachers and explained the grants available for program accreditation. New this year is funding from TEFGA for the cost of NATEF accreditation application, manuals and site visit.

24 Georgia automotive teachers and administrators attended a NATEF (www.natef.org) workshop on industry accreditation at Hutchings Career Center in Macon Georgia. The event was hosted by TEFGA (www.tefga.org) Automotive Teachers from post secondary Technical College System of Georgia and DOE Secondary schools received a update on the the new model for NATEF and AYES from AYES South East Field Manager Sonny Reeves. DOE Program Specialist Ms. Carol Burke presented to the group about opportunities and news from the DOE and TEFGA.  New updates from NATEF are on this site http://www.natef.org

24 of Georgia’s automotive teachers and administrators attended the NATEF Accreditation update workshop from high schools, career academy and technical colleges.

Highlights of the workshop are the ASE Student Certification, http://www.asestudentcertification.com/

The NATEF 2012 Standards and task lists for MLR, AST and MAST. these are on the New NATEF site www.natef.org

Presentation on the TEFGA Expo by Ms. Burke, video     http://youtu.be/umMlFYjpfxU

The AYES model for interns and mentoring  www.ayes.org

Contact information   cburke@doe.k12.ga.us   sonny.reeves@ayes.org

Lowndes County High School adds AYES program to NATEF Accredited Automotive Program

November 6, 2012

Many good things are going on almost behind the scenes in our career programs.  I visit a lot of very good Automotive programs and here is one that is special to me. I first met Cory and Don via the New Teacher class at Valdosta State. Dr. Charles Backes has taught this course for new Trade and Industry teachers for quite some time. I presented to the class Corey and Don when they started teaching and right off I knew they were remarkable!

They have never let me down. They took an old, outdated and unsafe auto program; and created a safe, industry recognized learning environment.

The program supervisors Mr. Bruce Crook and Ms. Lynne Wilson have every reason to be proud of these two teachers, as they demonstrate excellence in education! It is wonderful to see what happens when professionals with the right attitudes get together on a team effort.

The Business and Education meeting starts with a lunch and everyone is introduced. Corey introduces former student and now Griner Cadillac’s master transmission specialist Michael Powell to his right. Mike Marafino,(white shirt) service manager Griner Cadillac looks on, as does Steve Riley,(blue shirt) service manager, Langdale Honda listens to Corey.

Many of the members have current and former students of the program as employees

Many of the members have current and former students of the program as employees. All agreed that the AYES model of the mentor and intern will benefit the franchise and the students of the program.

The Advisory Committee for the Lowndes County High School

Automotive Program recently approved affiliation with AYES.  The purpose of Automotive Youth Educational Systems (AYES)  is to develop career-ready, entry-level automotive technicians and service personnel through a series of Business and Education partnerships.  High school automotive technology students are presented the opportunity and guidance to explore rewarding automotive careers, and provided the tools and support to learn, develop and practice  the technical, academic and employability skills needed for success. The capstone of the AYES model is a 320-hour workplace internship, usually during the summer between the junior and senior year, where working along side a trained and qualified mentor – usually an ASE-certified Master Technician – the student prepares for entry-level career.

LCHS Automotive Advisory members represent many of the local dealerships and service centers.  Pictured left to right:  (Front row) Steve Riley, Langdale Honda; Don Faircloth, Lowndes High; Mike Marifino, Tommer Griner Cadillac/Nissan; Sonny Reeves, AYES Field Manager; David Wilson and Scott Colwell, Langdale Ford.  (Back row) Roger Christie, Lowndes County Schools Transportation Director; Michael Powell, Tommy Griner;  Bruce Crook and Corey Nawolski, Lowndes High School.  Members committed to support the program but unable to attend the meeting are

Prince Chevrolet – Alan McLendon
Pipkin Motors – Sue Steadman
Langdale Hyundai – Staphanie Augustine
Valdosta Toyota – Terrill Head
Cass Burch – Rusty Griffin (Quitman Dodge and Chevrolet)
                    Scott McQuaid (Valdosta Dodge and Jeep)
Attending the meeting and taking the picture:
Lynne J. Wilson
Director of CTAE and Public Relations
Lowndes County Schools
1592 Norman Drive
Valdosta, GA  31601
The Automotive program is fortunate to have two highly motivated teachers. Here is more about these excellent teachers.
                                                                                            Automotive   Instructor Don Faircloth explains a math problem in a Brakes class

Don Faircloth II – Don is married with 2 children, 19 and 13. He has been an Automotive teacher at Lowndes County High School in Valdosta, Georgia for 9 years. Don has been around cars most of his life. He helped his father rebuild his first engine at age 7, and rebuilt his first engine solo at age 14. After his time in the U.S. Navy studying Nuclear Physics, he returned to Valdosta and began a career in the automotive industry. Don has worked in many aspects of the industry; from managing an AutoZone parts store for 5 years, to working at independent garages, to working at factory dealerships before receiving the opportunity to become a teacher. Don is an ASE Master Technician, as well as a Ford Master Technician. He has received over 600 hours of specialized training from Ford Motor Co. Since Don has began teaching in 2004, he has returned to school and received his Bachelors of Science in Education and his Masters of Education degrees from Valdosta State University. He is currently on track to start his Doctorate degree in the spring. Teaching is Don’s passion. He loves the opportunity to shape our youth into valuable and contributing members of society and help keep our industry thriving through generations to come.

Corey shared how many new items were recently purchased for the students to use in training.

Corey Nawolski is an Automotive instructor at Lowndes County High School (LCHS) in Valdosta, Georgia. He began working on cars with his father as a young child. When Corey enrolled in High School (at Lowndes High), he began taking automotive classes. During his senior year, Corey transitioned into the Youth Apprenticeship program where the school systems transportation department employed him. In 2005, Corey transitioned from being a technician into the teaching profession. In 2009, he was honored as the Georgia Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) New Teacher of the Year; Corey then went on to win the New Teacher of the Year award for Region Two (Southeastern United States). While actively seeking to improve the LCHS Automotive program, Corey has pursued higher education. He has completed his undergraduate and Master’s degree. In addition, he is working on his doctorate and should complete it during the upcoming summer.

For information on obtaining NATEF   accreditation for your program please contact www.natef.org

For information on the industry recognized AYES model for interns and mentors please contact http://www.ayes.org

AYES Presentation

July 16, 2011

Time Passes Will YouNACAT2011a1

Click on the link above to download the powerpoint of the presentation of “Developing the 21st Century Classroom”

The slides have links embedded for you to click on to learn more about developing your classroom.

Presented at the 2011 AYES conference in Seattle from an earlier presentation at NACAT 2010 and 2009

Constantly updated….stay in touch

Outback and in Sight, Used Oil and Safety Glasses or How many lawyers do you know?

May 1, 2011

What is my responsibility to all these rules and regulations concerning the environment? Safety?

Often on visits to schools and colleges I find some that are unsure of what the requirements are for compliance with EPA and OSHA regulations. Some even think that these federal regulations and state laws do not apply to schools. Well, I would not want to be the instructor or administrator that was responsible for a violation. In the 21st century we are all personally responsible to our society to be aware and protect the environment by being good stewards of our world. When I was a youth dumping used oil and other fluids was considered OK as long as you dumped it somewhere else. Today you and your facility can be held liable for even small oil spills or negligent storage practices. All states consider used oil a hazardous waste and hold the generator of the oil liable for proper storage and disposal. To become a known polluter would be foolish in today’s litigation prone world. Oil storage that is open to rainfall is apt to leak in to the ground water. Oil and fluids stored out in open are hazards to spills however accidental and that makes the person who authorized or was in charge of the materials responsible for their proper storage and safe conduct to the recycle center. I feel the old rule of “CYOA” applies in making sure my shop/lab is in compliance. It is very simple to comply with the regulations. All hazardous materials: used oil, trans fluid, brake fluid, paints, solvents, coolant, batteries and used parts should have a visible closed loop back to a recycling facility or supplier. Nothing from your shop/lab should go to the landfill. Have a spill containment platform with proper storage drums/containers for all fluids. Use a lid or covering with a funnel system that is easy for students to use in transfer of fluids.

Fig#1 This containment pallet and two drums is an inexpensive solution. This needs to be underneath a shed or overhang where rainwater will not collect on drum tops of course. Also, used lead acid batteries may be stored here  until routine collection to a recycle center.

Fig #2, A commercial set for spill and storage containment. www.newpig.com Even this set up would need protective lids and cover from rainfall, high winds and impact damage.

Protecting the individual student

Personal Protective Equipment is required for all persons in contact with hazardous material. This means you and your students, Reference Ga. Code O.C.G.A. § 45-22-2 (all states have similar statements) This means compliance with right to know and MSDS requirements being followed with a documented safety and HazMat training. I will recommend a certificate program like www.sp2.org that will give certification and validate your training of student/employees. This will also cover you in the event of an accident in your lab.

I will never understand the “Push Back” I get from teachers in auto labs that don’t require students to wear safety glasses. Many times I visit otherwise good programs to find students in the lab working without safety glasses. I recently visited a lab and students were grinding metal with air grinders and no PPE or glasses were in use. When asked the instructor replied he had gave up trying to make them wear them. Another teacher said he never wore them at work and did not see the need to make kids wear them. I visited two labs a few years ago with the director and when we observed students working in the lab without safety glasses and I stated the requirement for safety glasses the instructor and the administrator asked me where that rule was as if it were not a common sense practice to protect students from eye injury.

I have a video (Safety Glasses)of students holding a brake clip that had cracked the student’s safety glasses when the clip broke while he was working on the brakes. That is why we call them accidents.

See Georgia School Board Rule (All states have similar rules);

160-4-3-.10

Code : JGF 160-4-3- .10 EYE PROTECTION . (1) REQUIREMENTS . (a) Each local board of education shall adopt a policy for ensuring the safety of every student, teacher and visitor participating in or observing certain courses of instruction in any school . (b) Such policy shall require that persons wear appropriate industrial-quality eye protection equipment at…
http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/…legalservices/160-4-3-.10.pdf

NATEF requires this as a Go-No-Go for accreditation of the program.As always NATEF is the final authority on their standards. Please check with http://www.natef.org for latest updates.

OSHA regulation 29 CFR 1910.132

I will refer you to documents and resources on this page;

https://autoteacher.net/NATEF__Teacher_Helps.html

This is the assumption of the learning environment that NATEF places on Accredited Programs;

http://www.natef.org/documents/auto_standards_2008.pdf

Quote;

12. The concern for safety is paramount to the learning environment. Each program area has the following safety requirement preceding all related tasks:

Comply with personal and environmental safety practices associated with clothing; eye protection; hand tools; power equipment; proper ventilation; and the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals/materials in accordance with local, state, and federal safety and environmental regulations.

Page 8 “ reference NATEF standards http://www.natef.org

A quick google brings up more information. Here is the summary.

Hazardous Material Storage, includes waste oil, transmission fluid, anti freeze and other automotive fluids. Federal Regulations;

http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=41e1500fdf914c7c862ab38890889e35&rgn=div5&view=text&node=40:26.0.1.1.9&idno=40#40:26.0.1.1.9.3.47.3

PUBLIC LAW 96-463 defines used oil as a hazard to human health.

O.C.G.A. § 12-8-62  (2011) quotes the above law in defining the handling of used oil. All States have similar laws and rules.

All public officials are required to know the laws affecting the workplace they are responsible for. O.C.G.A. § 45-22-2

http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=41e1500fdf914c7c862ab38890889e35&rgn=div5&view=text&node=40:26.0.1.1.9&idno=40#40:26.0.1.1.9.3.47.3

EPA Document; http://www.epa.gov/owow/NPS/ordinance/

Ga Governmental Document http://www.gaepd.org/Files_PDF/techguide/wpb/noiguidance.pdf

Fig # 3 a student with an oil saver he made for use in lab. The drop or two of oil in the bottles is collected in the bucket for recycling in stead of the trash. The plastic bottles are recycled also.

A Resource;

http://www.newpig.com/us/

This company will be pleased to explain the rules, law and regulations that apply to you and your facility. They are qualified experts that can advise on products and their use. I find them easy to work with in understanding EPA and OSHA as it pertains to schools.

If I can be of service to you or your teachers with training, information please let me know. In all these safety issues I would rather be over than under when in comes to meeting the safety issues we all face in our auto labs.

Remember this “It is not about budgets, school boards or facilities but the safety of the individual student as they are in the learning environment you provide” Be aware, Be informed, Be safe!

Sonny Reeves www.autoteacher.net sonnyjreeves@hotmail.com

If you want time, You must make it

December 12, 2009

Time                                                                                        Teacher’s News letter December 2009

The bane of our educational existence is constant and immortal. I have not met a teacher that has enough time. We serve our students Bell to Bell. Then even more time is used to care for our lab, prepare for the next day’s instruction and begin the fast paced cycle again. Our battle is dubious and our enemy is time. We may be able to cast out the demons of dumbness and raise our students to higher standards but we still face the constraints of time. Our students are not always aware of our challenge to deliver quality instruction in the time allowed. When I informed my students of the tasks we must accomplish in a semester they shrugged it off as my problem not theirs.

A few years back Dale Fasenmeyer of the PTEC CAP program in St. Pete Florida and now AYES coordinator for PTEC used the Chrysler Flat Rate Manual and the NATEF Task list to analyze the real time vs the curriculum time required to do the Steering and Suspension A4 course in the time allowed by the school system. What he found was that the flat rate to do the tasks in the course would pay over 400 hours to a technician in the dealership yet the instructor only has 150 hours to teach the course. Now Dale used common sense and grouped related tasks to figure time so don’t think he was not practical in his calculations. We talk of completing the course; following the syllabus and lesson plans, yet we know that some students just do not get it! Let’s be honest here and don’t drink the popular lemonade that says all children can learn. That statement is in many school mission statements but I feel it is too wide a brush to paint a picture of our classrooms today.  Now if you think that all children can learn you need to stop reading right now because I know I have taught many children to lead productive lives in our industry; yet some will be good technicians, some will one day own their own businesses, while some will be those that work hard but not smart. We won’t speak of the others, those that are not interested in learning. Well I will share this one with you!

I had a student a while back that  had a lot of behavior and motivation problems. I sent him to the principal and she asked him why was he here if he did not want to be a learner in my class. He said” I’m here for th’ wemens and th’ food!” He was 19 in the 10th grade, his mom was 33 and she was no help in the problems he caused. I think she became a grandmother before the year was out.

I feel that our education system needs to be a place where learning is constant and time is variable, not the system we have now where time is the master and learning is by the numbers. So many potentially good students are beaten down by subjects they will never use and are not taught the subjects with the relevance they need in a way that meets their learning style. Example: My wife teaches middle grades science and she asked me for some ways to teach the principles of electricity. I gave her loads of material to use and she protested she only had one and a half hours in the semester to teach electricity. Did you know that it is possible to leave middle school and never have taken a science class? Did you know that some students can get to the 9th grade having never passed a class in any subject at any grade level in our current system. Over 70% of middle grade students in some states are passed by this method. It is called social promotion.

Imagine a world where you as a student learn what you want when you want. I am getting way out of the box now and even say get rid of the box as it often hinders learning. I like the statement from Jeff Curtis at NACAT 2009 “Learning should be Viral” I will not bore you with numbers I can’t remember, but the largest population in our prisons are High School drop outs. What we are doing as a nation in education is not working.  Let’s imagine students that come to your class because they learn there, not that you teach, but that they know they will learn in your class/lab because you are the facilitator of the learning process. You open windows of opportunity and learning for them. Now you can’t raise the dead or walk on water but students know they will learn when they become stake holders in your class/lab. You enable, you inspire and you require the student to meet your standards. Our good students will thrive in this environment, our less than good or to be politically incorrect: behavior disordered, unmotivated students would not get it if you injected it into their vacant skulls. In 15 years of teaching I never figured out what to do with them. Maybe the proponents of the NCLB and “Everyone can Learn” theory of education will one day get their car fixed by a student that was socially promoted, only made the minimum passing grade in the shop classes and is now been hired to work at a dealership because the dealer can’t find enough qualified applicants that want to work with their hands in our craft. I wonder what they will say about the work that is done incorrectly on their expensive vehicle. Will they say ‘ Oh that’s alright, He is doing the best he can” or as my 3rd grade teacher said as she patted me on my shoulder “Bless your little heart” What she really meant was “You ain’t never gonna get this!”

Do not waste that most precious commodity on them “Time.”

Imagine the students online with a cutting edge curriculum that requires the student to interact and move the mouse to make things happen as they would under the hood. Not watching a video or reading volumes of text but very accurate technical graphics with learning the way students live/learn embedded in the lessons. Imagine the student online at home, on their phone, in the media center, the city library or at any time. When I introduced this learning style to my students they quickly adapted to it because I required the learning online as a prerequisite to the lab. My students will do anything to get into the lab/shop. I made it a requirement that they successfully complete specific lessons online before they can practice the task in the lab/shop.

Enjoy your winter break, spend time with your family. Sharpen the saw!  Here is an “Excuse Grinder” you can build if you have time. The excuse grinder will save hours in your class by grinding up student excuses quickly.    http://got.im/59861

You can do all this when you have time. I can show you how to save time in your classroom and lab.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you and yours!

Sonny



You teach, Who Learns? or Learns how to learn

October 2, 2009

Learning to Learn or How do you teach?  October Auto Teacher News

Many years ago in a 9th grade algebra classroom I sat bewildered by all the new concepts and theories being presented. I did not get it! The teacher was unconcerned by my lack of understanding. All she did was read romance novels and keep the class quite. Large stacks of “Ditto” sheets and a textbook were the mainstream of her teaching. When I said I did not understand the problems I was told to read the book. When another student tried to help me I was disciplined for talking in class. After almost all “A” report cards my grades started to slip. Behavior issues began, rather than be considered dumb I would be known for my misbehavior. Soon the math class for me was to sit in the back of the room with my desk facing the wall, bored and forgotten. No one ever impressed upon me the need for my knowing the subject.

Who knows the difference a concerned math teacher could have made in the course of my life. I know the lack of an understanding of math has held me back in some cases. My love of the science of electricity has been limited by my ignorance of the higher math required for a degree in Electrical Engineering. I am sure if I had dedicated math teachers like Ms. Jones or Ms. Sirmans who teach with me at Hutchings my life would have been different and possibly easier.  As it was I have had to adapt and work harder to overcome my shortcomings in math. I can see myself in many of my students. They are bored, discipline problems abound, and because only few teachers are dedicated enough to get through to them they will drop out or otherwise not reach their full potential.

How do you teach? Do you expound on the facts of our high tech world and seek to teach every new thing under the Sun/Hood of our high tech world and the new cars? Or do you seek to instill what Jorge Menchu calls “Learning to Learn” and prepare your students to think, learn and create their own high tech world of “Knowing” instead of just memorizing the fact so as to repeat it for a test.  I know that you want the best for your students and you truly want to be the best teacher you can be. Here are some observations for you. When I was around eight years old I was a very good whistler, in fact I was the best there was among my eight year old peers. I had the summer off and my dog and I set out to do what all boys and their dog will do during a summer of fun. I wanted to do something for my dog. Now all boys love their dog when they are eight. I wanted the best for my dog. I wanted to teach my dog to whistle! I proceeded to teach and my dog listened with a wagging tail and open expression on his doggy face. I taught my heart out to an attentive pupil. At the end of the summer my dog could whistle no better than he could at the beginning. In fact he never could or would. No one impressed the dog with the reason he needed to whistle. There was no relevance or rigor in my teaching all we had was a relationship.

I now know better than to try and teach at my level to a student’s level with out an adjustment for learning styles and prior knowledge that the student has. A grave disservice is that many students I have today have not had physical science since sixth grade.  In order to teach electrical or hydraulics I have to back up and teach basics of science and physics. Now in my class the student finally has a relevant course that gives a tangible reason of how electricity is used to operate a relay that causes a fuel pump to pump fuel to run the engine. When I explain a modern automobile I teach, that the vehicle we use and service today, is basically the same as the 1960’s model our fathers and grandfathers knew except the manufactures have added an average of $27000.00 worth of safety, emissions controls and accessories we must have. The Chevy I bought new in 1969 was $2895.00 today the same basic car is $30,000.00. Now this essay is not to argue the merits, prices or attributes a of a car line. I would like to propose that the car of today is still operating off the same basic physics, science and math principles of the first car ever built. The Wow! and Whiz Bang of the High Tech vehicles we are seeing pop up like mushrooms after a summer rain are nothing more than $27000.00 worth of safety, emissions and accessories added to our 1969 car’s basic fundamental principals of physics, science and math.

Here are my hard questions. Why are our programs looked upon as a savior for students that did not do well in middle grades science and math classes?  Why are we expected to teach our physics, science and math to students that either failed or made Cs and Ds in those subjects?  Why are our hands on classes looked upon as inferior to academic classes by state school boards when good techs in all trades are making economic progress in these hard times and college grads can’t find jobs?

What’s up with this? Do you teach to the test or for life long learning? Do you teach the basics? Do you create a hunger for learning in your student?

Hope this Helps,

Sonnyjreeves@hotmail.com

E learning the next step in Developing the 21st Century Class

September 8, 2009
Failed to evolve

Failed to evolve

Online E Learning, more on developing the 21st Century Classroom.

I have a simple vision for online courses. Model the Honda/Toyota training center procedures that have been used for several years to train the dealership technicians. This is a successful industry model of proven performance. I am sure many of you have attended the factory training centers of your choice. All the major players are using the online delivery of theory and cognitive instruction. I know from first hand experience that Ford and GM do. I have attended their training several years ago. I assume they have continued as one of my former students who is now at a Ford Dealership said he is taking the course work online and he likes it. I enrolled in the Honda University Online training in 2004. I complete course work online in the subject areas I need training in and then attend the American Honda Training Center near Atlanta for a week each June to complete the hands on portion of the course work I learned online. Honda has been very generous to allow AYES and NATEF Instructors to attend free of charge. The instructors at the training center can check our online transcripts and advise us which hands on modules we can test out on. We select the module and are assigned a vehicle as needed and follow the instructions much as if we are at the dealership and complete the task. The instructor checks our documentation and asks pertinent questions about the procedure to verify our understanding. The instructor may require us to demonstrate the procedure or task to prove mastery. The instructor is always available to help with our understanding or demonstrate the correct procedure. They may ask that we review the online lesson or redirect us to another course to learn before we attempt the module so that we build on learning.

I have used this facilitating of the learning environment in my class/lab for years with great effect. See my post for

https://autoteachersonny.wordpress.com/

Now if you understand the Honda model for E learning we can move on to the next step on how we can use it in our classroom/lab. Many of you are already using the SP/2 for safety training. Are you backing it up with hands on performance test to prove mastery? See

https://autoteacher.net/Electrical_PerformanceTests for examples of hands on test rubrics

Take the next step and assign a hands on course to students and allow 24/7 access. Set a date/time for hands on labs and practice of tasks. Set a date/time for hands on testing for mastery of the tasks in your lab. Now repeat until you and the students are comfortable with this type learning and assessment.

Now take the next step. Assign a task(s) to a student in Work Based Learning, YAP, DCT or AYES. (By the way, AYES is the model for this next step.) Of course the student must work at a shop that has an ASE technician who is certified in the course area you are enrolling the student. The workplace and the technician must agree to be the mentor for the student. Training for the mentor and the workplace is done by you or the school’s representative. Hopefully the AYES model of mentor/intern training is used and the mentor is now qualified to sign off for the student’s mastery of the tasks. Again the use of the AYES model of documentation and tracking is already proven so why reinvent the wheel. The next step is to use the online curriculum you develop and enroll students that can not normally attend your class/lab. Maybe even students in another school, county, state, or nation? Maybe by using the synergy of ASE, NATEF, NACAT, AYES and IATN we could develop a learning environment that is global. Maybe we can create an automotive learning virus that will infect future technicians everywhere. I know there are details and problems we need to solve. Any one that says “No” just needs to “Know” more about e learning which is evolving as we speak. I am doing it now and have been since 2005 school year when I combined my experience with Honda training with AYES mentor/intern experience and training and added in the resources of my web site. See

https://autoteacher.net/E_Learning.html

See August post if you missed it

https://autoteachersonny.wordpress.com/2009/08/

Enjoy,

Sonny Reeves

August Auto Teacher News

July 31, 2009

I hope you were fortunate enough to attend the NACAT conference in Charlotte this past July. The very best in training, teachers and fun for all was there. The staff at CCPC was awesome. The fellow teachers were wonderful and almost all my heroes were there. The presentations were as they should be; on the cutting edge of technology, informative with all the latest and greatest explained in detail by the authors and creators. Very much an enjoyable and restoring week. As one of the seven principles of Covey “Sharpening the Saw” is important if we are to do a good job of serving our customers. See the NACAT.org web site for more on the great workshops we enjoyed! Many times during the week I was reminded about how important it is for us to rely on each other. No one else knows the difficulty of the duties of an auto teacher. The vendor that has never been in a classroom of teenagers does not have a clue as to why his great product won’t meet our needs until classroom control can be achieved. The engineer that can expound for hours on the inner workings of the automobile and can’t build working professional relationships with students is at a loss to explain why he/she can’t seem to hold a student’s attention. The academic teacher that has never had to deal with the retail customer driven world can’t understand our passion for excellance in our teaching. We know that the automobile owner will hold their auto techncian and service center to a higher standard than their Doctor. We know that our students don’t care what we know until they know we care.
If you were able to attend Jeff Curtis’ presentation you now know how not to do a power point. If you attended the NATEF training for ETL’s you now know how important the integrity of the evaluator is for the validation of all our programs. Many of the teachers I spoke with are sincerely concerned with the state of our industry. Many new teachers were there and that is good, but it only means we have more to do in the nurturing and support of these new teachers. There is a lot we need to know to do this teaching, way more than new ways to do a volt drop test that I learned or to safely train our students to service Hybrids in an excellent fast paced class by Craig. There is a lot to know and a lot to learn. I am thankful for NACAT and all they do for us.
We all mourn the passing of one of my heroes, Fred Hines and we see the retirement of many good teachers each year. Where will the new champions come from? We must nurture and protect our new teachers.
Share! Enjoy! Create! Celebrate!

Best wishes for the school year………….

Sonny Reeves http://www.autoteacher.net/ http://www.nacat.com/