Posts Tagged ‘Argo’

E learning the next step in Developing the 21st Century Class

September 8, 2009
Failed to evolve

Failed to evolve

Online E Learning, more on developing the 21st Century Classroom.

I have a simple vision for online courses. Model the Honda/Toyota training center procedures that have been used for several years to train the dealership technicians. This is a successful industry model of proven performance. I am sure many of you have attended the factory training centers of your choice. All the major players are using the online delivery of theory and cognitive instruction. I know from first hand experience that Ford and GM do. I have attended their training several years ago. I assume they have continued as one of my former students who is now at a Ford Dealership said he is taking the course work online and he likes it. I enrolled in the Honda University Online training in 2004. I complete course work online in the subject areas I need training in and then attend the American Honda Training Center near Atlanta for a week each June to complete the hands on portion of the course work I learned online. Honda has been very generous to allow AYES and NATEF Instructors to attend free of charge. The instructors at the training center can check our online transcripts and advise us which hands on modules we can test out on. We select the module and are assigned a vehicle as needed and follow the instructions much as if we are at the dealership and complete the task. The instructor checks our documentation and asks pertinent questions about the procedure to verify our understanding. The instructor may require us to demonstrate the procedure or task to prove mastery. The instructor is always available to help with our understanding or demonstrate the correct procedure. They may ask that we review the online lesson or redirect us to another course to learn before we attempt the module so that we build on learning.

I have used this facilitating of the learning environment in my class/lab for years with great effect. See my post for

https://autoteachersonny.wordpress.com/

Now if you understand the Honda model for E learning we can move on to the next step on how we can use it in our classroom/lab. Many of you are already using the SP/2 for safety training. Are you backing it up with hands on performance test to prove mastery? See

https://autoteacher.net/Electrical_PerformanceTests for examples of hands on test rubrics

Take the next step and assign a hands on course to students and allow 24/7 access. Set a date/time for hands on labs and practice of tasks. Set a date/time for hands on testing for mastery of the tasks in your lab. Now repeat until you and the students are comfortable with this type learning and assessment.

Now take the next step. Assign a task(s) to a student in Work Based Learning, YAP, DCT or AYES. (By the way, AYES is the model for this next step.) Of course the student must work at a shop that has an ASE technician who is certified in the course area you are enrolling the student. The workplace and the technician must agree to be the mentor for the student. Training for the mentor and the workplace is done by you or the school’s representative. Hopefully the AYES model of mentor/intern training is used and the mentor is now qualified to sign off for the student’s mastery of the tasks. Again the use of the AYES model of documentation and tracking is already proven so why reinvent the wheel. The next step is to use the online curriculum you develop and enroll students that can not normally attend your class/lab. Maybe even students in another school, county, state, or nation? Maybe by using the synergy of ASE, NATEF, NACAT, AYES and IATN we could develop a learning environment that is global. Maybe we can create an automotive learning virus that will infect future technicians everywhere. I know there are details and problems we need to solve. Any one that says “No” just needs to “Know” more about e learning which is evolving as we speak. I am doing it now and have been since 2005 school year when I combined my experience with Honda training with AYES mentor/intern experience and training and added in the resources of my web site. See

https://autoteacher.net/E_Learning.html

See August post if you missed it

https://autoteachersonny.wordpress.com/2009/08/

Enjoy,

Sonny Reeves

August Auto Teacher News

July 31, 2009

I hope you were fortunate enough to attend the NACAT conference in Charlotte this past July. The very best in training, teachers and fun for all was there. The staff at CCPC was awesome. The fellow teachers were wonderful and almost all my heroes were there. The presentations were as they should be; on the cutting edge of technology, informative with all the latest and greatest explained in detail by the authors and creators. Very much an enjoyable and restoring week. As one of the seven principles of Covey “Sharpening the Saw” is important if we are to do a good job of serving our customers. See the NACAT.org web site for more on the great workshops we enjoyed! Many times during the week I was reminded about how important it is for us to rely on each other. No one else knows the difficulty of the duties of an auto teacher. The vendor that has never been in a classroom of teenagers does not have a clue as to why his great product won’t meet our needs until classroom control can be achieved. The engineer that can expound for hours on the inner workings of the automobile and can’t build working professional relationships with students is at a loss to explain why he/she can’t seem to hold a student’s attention. The academic teacher that has never had to deal with the retail customer driven world can’t understand our passion for excellance in our teaching. We know that the automobile owner will hold their auto techncian and service center to a higher standard than their Doctor. We know that our students don’t care what we know until they know we care.
If you were able to attend Jeff Curtis’ presentation you now know how not to do a power point. If you attended the NATEF training for ETL’s you now know how important the integrity of the evaluator is for the validation of all our programs. Many of the teachers I spoke with are sincerely concerned with the state of our industry. Many new teachers were there and that is good, but it only means we have more to do in the nurturing and support of these new teachers. There is a lot we need to know to do this teaching, way more than new ways to do a volt drop test that I learned or to safely train our students to service Hybrids in an excellent fast paced class by Craig. There is a lot to know and a lot to learn. I am thankful for NACAT and all they do for us.
We all mourn the passing of one of my heroes, Fred Hines and we see the retirement of many good teachers each year. Where will the new champions come from? We must nurture and protect our new teachers.
Share! Enjoy! Create! Celebrate!

Best wishes for the school year………….

Sonny Reeves http://www.autoteacher.net/ http://www.nacat.com/

April Auto teacher News

July 30, 2009

April 6, 2009 Teacher News

A vocational supervisor asked me about online curriculum last week during an Industry Certification site visit. We were in a new auto lab with nothing as of yet purchased in the way of curriculum. Now just so we are all on the same page what do you call curriculum? If all it is for the teacher and student to have a textbook then I feel pain for your students in this fast paced, ever changing technology world we train for the future in. Curriculum to me is everything from all your resources; textbooks, lesson plans for the course and each day, web based resources, online modules, transitional trainers, assessments and rubrics you use to judge your delivery and student mastery. I also include the LCD, digital cameras and video equipment, smart boards and student computers.
In the conversation we had he also asked how I taught automotive. I replied that lecturing more than 20 minutes is a waste of time; few people can hold or give attention longer than 20 minutes. I described how I teach. Each day of course varies along with each class is different. Sometimes I demonstrate with real car parts how the system works beginning with the simple science or physics first. I then describe how the system relates to something they know, like how vacuum is used to fill their lungs in the same way a combustion cylinder is filled with fuel/air mix. I may have already assigned an online resource for the students to watch online, or I may project it on the smart board and use the video or graphics to demo the system. The online resources I use are from the very latest virtual reality programs using the latest technology. See
http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=b2b198b5bb5ba7961a95

The student may have homework to learn or introduce the system before the class. We then go with our teams to the lab for a practical demonstration of the system either on a real vehicle or a transitional trainer. What is a transitional trainer? A Transitional Trainer is one that uses real parts and/or cutaways to give the student something they can see in operation, touch, and demo just like the component or system was in a live vehicle. It may be a set of lights or cooling fans on a board that allows students to hook up and operate just as it would on a vehicle. The trainers can be made to order by a company or created by students in your lab. See
http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=82054fbac07cd4a8ba2b

http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=061806a5f4b358e1d5fc

http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=16d496f4d48b6d5e513b

I tell all my students that this is a fun, working class; they work and I have fun.
Seriously I become the facilitator of learning instead of the fount of all knowledge and professor in charge of a lock step lesson. Automotive technology is dynamic and evolving as we speak. The methods of the 60s will not meet the needs of today’s digital native “Why” generation student. If you were to check most of your students have learned to memorize for the test. They are masters of using short term memory to meet the academic requirements of NCLB testing. We have to challenge them to stop using short term memory to meet long term goals. Learning to learn is our biggest challenge. Next month “Performance Testing!

Sonny Reeves www.autoteacher.net

Teacher news letter for July

July 30, 2009

July 12, 2009 Auto teacher news Shop/Lab Considerations

When an automotive person designs and builds an automotive shop they will aim towards a profitable design. Things like customer service and work flow have to be considered. For the education of students a different perspective is required. One must of course consider safety and environmental issues. I know many of you have shops/labs that were built before you had input into the design. We all have to be flexible and adapt to what we have to deal with. Some are being blessed with funds and development of new labs or renovation of old labs is being considered. I have several calls and e mails recently about new construction of an auto lab for schools.
Mind you that I am not an architect or builder. I did build one dealership shop in the 70s that I owned and later built an independent auto service center I also owned. I am going to include pictures and video links in this newsletter. A visual is worth a lot of writing. This will not cover the classroom which must be separate!
Here are my concerns in this short news letter. A school lab needs to have good lighting and ventilation. Exhaust fans are required to move vehicle exhaust fumes out of the lab area. A shop may be profitable with X number of lifts per XX square feet of floor space, but to teach you know you need lots of room to place all those students where they can observe what you are demonstrating. Like wise heavy duty tables with vises in sufficient numbers to allow all students to practice tasks and layout modules during class. Lots of storage to allow student projects to be organized and controlled. I would recommend a lift and two tables for each four students. These four would work out of one tool set as a team. All special tools are kept in HD plastic parts boxes labeled and organized to the tasks that need to be done. All tools would be organized to the tasks required and in the respective boxes. Generic tools would be displayed on boards or walls. The goal here is for the newest student to be able to find the tool without hassle. Dark tool rooms full of clutter are not profitable in shops or efficient in school labs. Piles of stuff left over and disassembled parts that are no value to the training program should be recycled asap.
The lab should have walkways marked and open for traffic with signage visible to all of where the exits and what the area or room is named. Everything should have a place and everything should be well marked for all to see.
The facility on the DOE web site is efficient and will work better than the labs they built back in the 80s. I had one of those at the first school I taught at. We redesigned it fixing several safety issues.
Here is the plan http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/DMGetDocu20Layouts

The safety of the student is the most important factor in the design. There must be a safety shower and eyewash in the lab. Some schools have balked at this but now OSHA has ruled and how would you feel if one of your students was drenched with gasoline and you have no shower? Be sure to see the safety and clean up area of the Honda Training Center. I include this as the best example of a certified training program. Here it is
https://www.autoteacher.net/uploads/Visit_to_Honda_TC.ppt
I hope you have your own ideas of shop/lab designs to share. Please do!

Hope to see you at NACAT! Sonny

June post for Auto teacher news

June 29, 2009

Teacher News Transitions June 2009

I can not think of a better topic this month than transitions or change. No one likes change except wet babies. We are seeing more change than ever before in our lifetime of the US auto industry. Unless you are a hermit you are seeing the collapse of the major players in the US market. We are evolving in many ways, electric and hybrid innovations are everywhere. Budget cuts are hurting all levels of our work force. Even the best automotive business models are feeling the strain of change. Hindsight tells us they should have seen it coming, learned the lesson of the early 70s when the Oil barons raised the price by holding back production. I feel the traditional auto makers are now in the position of the buggy whip craftsmen of the early 1900s when the first cars drove by their shops. Many of those leather workers made the finest buggy whips in the world at the time. Those that were pro active and flexible survived and thrived making the oil seals, tops and seat covers for the new cars. Those that continued to make the buggy whips went the way of all things obsolete and unneeded.
If we as auto teachers take this summer to evaluate what we do, trim the things that we do that don’t work and be proactive about making the changes that benefit our students. Much like all companies and educational systems should during this time of economic recession and mental depression. We can come out of these troubled times with new ideas and strategies to benefit our students, our programs and our industry. If we continue to do the same old things we will have the same results, High drop out rates, teen apathy and little gain in the war on ignorance and dumbness.
I am encouraged by the recent news of the joining of forces of ASE, AYES and SkillsUSA. These three figure heavily into my program, my student’s futures and my own life as a teacher. I know that only good things for my students can come from the synergy of these powerful organizations.
I am looking forward to this summer as a time of learning as I attend the American Honda Training Center in Alpharetta Georgia for a week of what I consider the finest example of hands on performance based automotive training program I have ever experienced. I am looking forward to exploring and sharing as I visit the Netherlands to train with the folks at Electude and learn more about online delivery of instruction. www.electude.com
I am looking forward to sharing and networking in Charlotte North Carolina as the best auto educators meet at the NACAT conference July 19-24. Since my first conference till now I have gained more resources for my students and met life long friends at NACAT. I know that we will solve all the world’s problems and maybe a few that will impact your classroom/lab. If you have not signed up do so today and I will see you there. www.nacat.com

Here is a recent article that I feel is important for our student’s parents to read.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/24/magazine/24labor-t.html?pagewanted=4&_r=1

“You can do the work of the mind without the hand, but not that of the hand without the mind.” Danish Proverb

Sonny Reeves https://www.autoteacher.net/Auto_Teacher_News.php